John Curtice's blog

Pages

Posts by this author:

John Curtice looks at the latest polls on independence, more devolution, further referendums and the party battle. This post originally appeared on What Scotland Thinks. A further tranche of results from YouGov’s poll for The Times was released on Saturday, while additional findings from Ipsos MORI... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
This blog originally appeared on What Scotland Thinks John Curtice asks how well did the polls do and which was closest to the result? Clearly the most important features of the referendum result are which side won and which lost, and how politicians react and respond to the outcome. But there is a... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
John Curtice examines the latest polls, in a post originally published on What Scotland Thinks. Three polls of voting intentions were released yesterday evening and appear in today’s papers. One was conducted by ICM for The Scotsman, one by Survation for the Daily Mail while the third was undertake... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
In a blog originally published at The Conversation, John Curtice rounds up the debate thus far. Just a few short weeks ago, it looked as though it was clear who was going to win the Scottish independence referendum. Although the polls persistently disagreed with each other as to how far it was behi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
John Curtice of What Scotland Thinks on new entrants to the polling scene. The excitement generated by the narrowing of the No lead in the polls has unsurprisingly persuaded new media organisations to enter the polling fray. On Friday The Guardian commissioned its first poll of voting intentions in... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
The graph below shows What Scotland Thinks’ latest Poll of Polls and how it has evolved over time. The latest Poll of Polls is based on three polls by YouGov, one  by Survation, one by TNS BMRB  and one by Panelbase,  The polls were conducted between 28 August and  11 September. The most recent pol... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
John Curtice discusses the most recent polls and how in the final week of the campaign we may secure a clearer and more consistent picture of just where the referendum race stands. The last ten days have transformed perceptions of the referendum race. Although they persistently and consistently dis... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
John Curtice of What Scotland Thinks responds to the latest polls from YouGov and Panelbase. The original blog was published here. Last Tuesday YouGov, hitherto a company that had painted a pessimistic picture of the Yes side’s prospects of winning on 18th September, generated considerable exciteme... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
Tuesday’s leaders’ debate brought the hiatus to campaigning occasioned by the Commonwealth Games to an end, and marked the beginning of the final six week phase of the referendum. MSPs are back (early) at Holyrood and both sides are ready to fight it out for every last voter. The Yes side begin thi... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
John Curtice, in a post originally published on What Scotland Thinks, responds to the results of the TNS BMRB poll commissioned by Sir Tom Hunter. This weekend saw the publication of a second poll to be conducted by TNS BMRB for Sir Tom Hunter’s scotlandseptember18.com website, the stated aim of wh... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

Pages

Advert button

Media contacts

Latest blogs

  • 28th November 2014

    As more powers are devolved as a result of the Smith process and the political focus rests, increasingly, on Holyrood, what happens to Scots' relationship with the UK? Conversely, how do Westminster and Whitehall relate to the devolved institutions in Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast? Stephen Tierney, Professor of Constitutional Theory at Edinburgh and Fellow of the Centre on Constitutional Change, believes that federalism may be the last, best solution.

  • 27th November 2014

    The proposed changes in tax and welfare arrangements envisioned in the Smith Commission's report will increase the accountability of the Scottish Parliament, say David Bell and David Eiser. However, the lack of room for manoeuvre in terms of redistribution clearly won't meet the aspirations of those who hoped the commission would focus on social justice.

  • 27th November 2014

    The implications of the Smith Commission's report for the rest of the UK were highlighted both by the Prime Minister and leaders of English local government within a few hours of its publication. Professor Richard Wyn Jones, Director of the Wales Governance Centre, suggests that Smith may well have serious implications on the other side of the Tweed - and the Severn.

  • 27th November 2014

    The devolution of welfare provision has featured large in the public debate leading up to the publication of the Smith Commission's report. Many in civic Scotland had pushed for a significant form of welfare devolution. They are likely to be disappointed says Professor Nicola McEwen, Associate Director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change.

  • 27th November 2014

    Is the Smith Report devo-max? Not according to Professor Michael Keating, director of the ESRC Centre on Constitutional Change, who says that the proposals are neither devo-max nor the 'near federalism' suggested by Gordon Brown.

Read More Posts