John Curtice's blog

It is commonly asserted that what most Scots would like to happen after the referendum is for Scotland to have a more powerful parliament in Edinburgh, while remaining part of the United Kingdom.

This is, in truth, a considerable exaggeration. It would be more accurate to say that more devolution is the least unpopular of the various options that have been proposed. Even then it is far from clear that Scots accept all of the implications that giving Holyrood more power – and responsibility – would bring.

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John Curtice, in a post originally published on What Scotland Thinks, responds to the results of the TNS BMRB poll commissioned by Sir Tom Hunter. This weekend saw the publication of a second poll to be conducted by TNS BMRB for Sir Tom Hunter’s scotlandseptember18.com website, the stated aim of wh... Read more
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This blog originally appeared on What Scotland Thinks It has appeared to be the case for some time now that the referendum race has become becalmed once more. The Yes side appear to have maintained the gains they made in the winter, but without any consistent evidence of them having made any furthe... Read more
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In a blog posted on What Scotland Thinks, John Curtice reflects on the official campaign period which launches today.  As doubtless most readers will be aware, today marks the official start of the campaign for the independence referendum – that is the period during which the amount of money that t... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
It is commonly asserted that what most Scots would like to happen after the referendum is for Scotland to have a more powerful parliament in Edinburgh, while remaining part of the United Kingdom. This is, in truth, a considerable exaggeration. It would be more accurate to say that more devolution i... Read more
Post type: Blog entry
On the face of it Labour’s proposals for more devolution would appear to fall well short of what might be required to convince voters that a No vote would be followed by the kind of enhanced devolution that a majority of people in Scotland would apparently like to see. In recent years the Scottish... Read more
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Today’s co-ordinated statements by George Osborne, Ed Balls and Danny Alexander that they are not willing to contemplate the prospect of an independent Scotland forming a monetary union with the rest of the UK is probably the most dramatic intervention yet by the No side in the referendum campaign.... Read more
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This blog was republished from the Guardian, Thursday 30 January 2014 Economists tell us that the question of which currency to use is the most important financial decision that an independent state has to make. Meanwhile, whether or not they think independence would make Scotland more or less pros... Read more
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John Curtice reviews the polls. He finds that most indicators continue to suggest that the verdict will be No and argues that although the debate will range far and wide in the coming months, the victory will ultimately go to the side that presents the most convincing economic argument. This blog w... Read more
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by John Curtice, ESRC Fellow and  ScotCen Social Research To have a prospect of being a ‘game changer’, at least so far as the balance of public opinion is concerned, the independence White Paper needed to have hit two buttons. First it had to convince voters that they and their country would be ec... Read more
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The publication this week of the Scottish Government’s White Paper on Independence is arguably the most important development in the referendum campaign so far. It is intended to answer the public’s questions about what independence would entail – and to persuade them of the merits of a Yes vote. ... Read more
Post type: Blog entry

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